Category: Employment

Social Media Policies and the NLRB
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Social Media Policies and the NLRB | Richard Friedman

The National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) has continued to shape social media policies and practices at work for both employers and employees through recent decisions. This article will briefly discuss several such decisions which shed light on National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”)-protected union activities, the standards for employees’ disloyalty, and the standards for appropriate social media policies implemented by employers. In Pier Sixty, LLC, Nos. 02-CA-068612 and 02-CA-070797, an employee of a catering company posted “obscene vulgarities” on his Facebook page regarding a manager’s mistreatment of certain employees two days before a union representation election and was fired soon thereafter.

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Issues Arising in Negotiating Severance Agreements
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Issues Arising in Negotiating Severance Agreements | Richard Friedman

At the risk of stating the very obvious, a severance agreement should contain releases which protect the former employer from potential lawsuits brought by the former employee and his or her heirs. Severance compensation can serve as an important transition financial resource for a former employee. Thus, it is often in both parties’ interests to reach an agreement. This article will briefly identify some of the provisions that should be considered for possible inclusion in a severance agreement.

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Confidentiality Obligations of In-House and Outside Counsel in the Virtual Workplace
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Confidentiality Obligations of In-House and Outside Counsel in the Virtual Workplace | Richard Friedman

As is widely known, many technological advancements have been integrated into the legal industry in recent decades. Maintaining an electronic record of all information is standard operating procedure at large and small companies and law firms. Another major development, in the last half dozen or so years, in particular, has been the dramatic increase in the number of employees who telecommute one or more days a week and in many instances full time. Indeed, there are now virtual companies and law firms which maintain limited, if any, office space.

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Defend Trade Secrets Act of 2016
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Defend Trade Secrets Act of 2016 | Richard Friedman

In the Digital Information Age, where electronic data containing confidential information is so easily transferable, employers face a dilemma. On the one hand, they generally want to allow employees as much access to information as possible to promote efficient and uninterrupted workflow. On the other hand, there is always the risk that employees with access to highly sensitive information may misplace hard copies and/or flash drives containing such information or purposefully take key information to use on behalf of a competing future employer, for a business they have started or intend to start, or to damage the company because of a personal vendetta.

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Employer Social Media Practices/Policies and the NLRA
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Employer Social Media Practices/Policies and the NLRA | Richard Friedman

In recent years, as the use of social media has exploded, the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) has received allegations of improper discipline of employees for social media postings as well as complaints condemning employer social networking policies. We briefly discuss a few of those decisions below. In what came to be known as “the first Facebook case,” American Medical Response of Connecticut, Inc., No. 34-CA-12576, an employee criticized her supervisor in a Facebook post for denying her Union representation, which triggered responses from co-workers voicing their support. The employee was suspended the following day and later discharged.

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Non-Compete Agreements Under New York Law
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Non-Compete Agreements Under New York Law | Richard Friedman

Many employers try to limit former employees’ actions at the conclusion of the employment relationship through restrictive covenants. A restrictive covenant is a contractual agreement restricting the post-employment activities of a former employee for a fixed period after the termination of an employment relationship in order to protect the employer’s legitimate business interests. A. Protectable Interests

Non-compete agreements offer the widest range of protection for employers by limiting a prior employee’s ability to work for a competitor after the employment relationship ends.

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