Category: Elder Care

How Can a CSA Help Seniors and Their Families?
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Authored by , re: Elder Care, FINANCIAL ARTICLES, on .

{2:45 minutes to read} I began New York Financial Organizers in January of 2015. During the previous four months, I explored the world of geriatric services, joining a wonderful organization, the Orion Research Group, as an exploratory member. Many other members suggested that I become a Certified Senior Advisor (CSA).

Click here to read Peter Gordon's full article...

Protect Yourself From Financial Fraud
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Authored by , re: Elder Care, on .
Protect Yourself From Financial Fraud | Peter Gordon

{2:35 minutes to read} I have a client with cognitive loss who has had difficulty organizing his financial paperwork. One of the projects I’ve been working on for him is re-creating his 2015-2016 taxes. In doing this, I discovered a check he wrote for $15,000 to Wells Fargo. He has no account with Wells Fargo, doesn’t remember writing the check and had no clue as to what the money might be for. Click here to read Peter Gordon's full article...

Don’t Go Postal! Protect Yourself From Postal Scams
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Authored by , re: Elder Care, on .

{2 minutes to read} A notice flashing across the electronic bulletin board of my mother’s building the other day caught my attention. The author of that notice stated that he had mailed payments for bills at a mailbox on Broadway and East 10th Street and that those envelopes were literally fished out of the mailbox.

Click here to read Peter Gordon's full article...

Elder Law and Personal Injury Actions
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Authored by , re: Elder Care, on .
Elder Law and Personal Injury Actions | Ronald A. Fatoullah

By Ronald A. Fatoullah, Esq. and Debby Rosenfeld, Esq.

{4:00 minutes to read} Several years ago, Mrs. Flower entered a nursing home because she could no longer care for herself in the community. At the time, she was in her early 90s and had basically gone through most of her assets. The nursing home administration applied for Medicaid on her behalf in order to cover the cost of her long term care. It was a very straightforward case because she was essentially eligible for Medicaid from the get-go. Medicaid is a means-tested program; it will cover the cost of an individual’s long term care provided such person’s assets do not exceed a certain amount. In 2017, one cannot own more than $14,850 in non-exempt assets.

Click here to read Ronald Fatoullah's full article...

3 Components to Review in Long-term Care Insurance Policies
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Authored by , re: Elder Care, Insurance, on .
3 Components to Review in Long-term Care Insurance Policies | Peter Gordon

I pride myself on having a network of experts that I can turn to when clients have issues in areas I am not familiar with. In order to share this information with others, I will be posting guest blogs from colleagues. The first one is from Barbara A. Brody, a Specialist in Medical Management and Health Care Solutions (www.BarbaraBrody.com).

Click here to read Peter Gordon's full article...

Considerations When a Spouse Needs Nursing Home Care
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Authored by , re: Elder Care, on .
Considerations When a Spouse Needs Nursing Home Care | Ronald A. Fatoullah

By Ronald A. Fatoullah, Esq. and Stacey Meshnick, Esq.

{3:42 minutes to read} Nursing home care in the New York Metropolitan area can cost up to $18,000 per month. When one spouse becomes ill and requires nursing home care, the well spouse should seek the proper advice regarding the resulting issues and possible solutions.

When contemplating nursing home admission, a couple should make sure that all of their necessary documentation is in order. If they haven’t already done so, the couple should execute advance directives, namely a Power of Attorney, Health Care Proxy and Living Will.

Click here to read Ronald Fatoullah's full article...

3 Crucial Estate Planning Documents
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Authored by , re: Asset Management, Elder Care, Miscellaneous, Trusts, Estates & Elder law, on .
3 Crucial Estate Planning Documents | Peter Gordon

{4:40 minutes to read} Why should you have a living will, healthcare proxy, and power of attorney? People are living longer and enjoying fuller lives. However, it is possible that because of a sudden illness or injury, you may be unable to talk to a doctor to make decisions about your treatment or direct your financial decisions. To plan in advance, it is important to prepare a few simple legal forms.

Click here to read Peter Gordon's full article..

The Benefits of Community Medicaid for Seniors Who Want to Age in Place
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Authored by , re: Elder Care, on .
The Benefits of Community Medicaid for Seniors Who Want to Age in Place | Peter Gordon

I learned about Community Medicaid through a personal experience. A few years back, my mother had a hip replacement. At that time the doctor said the other hip would need to be replaced within a year. We assumed that everything would go according to schedule and mom would be up and walking again in the not-so-distant future.

Click here to read Peter Gordon's full article...

Terminating Household Employees Tips
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Authored by , re: Elder Care, Healthcare Management, on .
Terminating Household Employees Tips | Rebecca Eddy

Ideally, the dynamics between home employees, clients, and any other caregivers is amicable and beneficial to everyone involved. Unfortunately, there are situations where this is not the case.
Through the terminations for cause of two home health aides, we have learned what procedures are required by law, as well as steps to make the process as efficient and trouble-free as possible.
Client Attitude  
Clients may be reluctant to fire employees, even when they don’t like them and/or are fully aware that the employee is taking advantage of them. The client may also resist termination because of a strong personal bond with the employee or excessive attachment due to loneliness or diminishing cognitive function.

Getting Organized for the Tax Season
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Authored by , re: Elder Care, Healthcare Management, on .
Getting Organized for the Tax Season | Rebecca Eddy

Does thinking of April 15th put you or your clients in a state of panic? Many accountants send out Tax Organizer booklets in January, but not all clients use them. Some people have alternate systems in place that help them present their accountants with all the necessary information in an organized manner. Regardless of the method, there is value in streamlining the materials sent to accountants, who are most efficient when provided with the tools to do the job: accurate statements about income, expenses, and deductions.

Click here to read Rebecca Eddy's full article...

Have Seniors Become Their Own Worst Enemy?
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Authored by , re: Elder Care, MEDIATION, on .
Have Seniors Become Their Own Worst Enemy? by Sig Cohen

I used to like being told I look great for my age. It was a super ego-booster, made me feel special. But what did that remark really mean? It meant that the person making the remark has a stereotypical view of what older people SHOULD look like. And I didn’t fit their stereotype. It wasn’t really a compliment. It was a remark tainted with prejudice.

Click Here to read Sig Cohen's full article...

The Virtue of Vulnerability
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Authored by , re: Elder Care, MEDIATION, on .

On September 29, 2016, I sat riveted as Judge Michael Aloi of West Virginia encouraged mediators to become more vulnerable. The message, the messenger, and the audience’s response were stunning. The message was surprising because mediators are usually encouraged to be neutral. Judge Aloi reminded us that most of our clients are experiencing deep pain. Our visible empathy and deep listening can help them feel safer—show them they’ve been heard. Judge Aloi said our vulnerability shows we connect with them. It telegraphs, “You are important to me. You matter.”

Click here to read Carolyn Parr's full article

The High-Wire Act Called Mediation
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Authored by , re: Elder Care, MEDIATION, on .
The High-Wire Act Called Mediation by Sig Cohen

I once heard an experienced mediator comment: “I care, but I don’t care that much.” I never quite grasped his meaning. Was he suggesting that a mediation session is entirely in the hands of the parties, and if they can’t reach an agreement within a specific period of time, tough luck? Or did he feel that, despite how close the parties got to an agreement, if an impasse arose, he’d be damned if he’d fall on his sword to help them reach the finish line? Not always, but in many mediations, I feel like I’m one of the Flying Wallendas, balanced on a high wire trying to accomplish two things:

  1. Help the parties reach the far end of the wire (settling the case); and
  2. Not fall off the tightrope (i.e. keeping a party from leaving the session).

Click here to read Sig Cohen's full article

Nursing Home Abuse & Neglect
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Authored by , re: Elder Care, LAW RELATED ARTICLES, Personal Injury, on .
Nursing Home Abuse & Neglect | Howard Raphaelson

When admitting a loved one to a nursing home, we enter into a sacred trust with the facility and its caretakers. We fully expect that our loved ones will be properly cared for and always treated with dignity and respect. Unfortunately, negligence and outright abuse in nursing homes is far too common. Although many state and federal regulations have been established to protect nursing home residents, gross violations occur every single day, tragically compromising the health, well-being, and dignity of some of our society's most vulnerable members.

Click here to read Howard Raphaelson's full article...

Who’d Have Thought
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Authored by , re: Elder Care, MEDIATION, on .
Who'd Have Thought - Sig Cohen, Tough Conversations

As elder and adult family mediators, we keep learning about (not-so-new) legislation, court settlements, and resources that may pleasantly surprise many elders and their family members. Here are three that may benefit you, a loved one, or someone you support.

  1. Medicaid is Not a Single Program
Many, including myself, thought that Medicaid covers only nursing home care for low- and no-income individuals who financially qualify for the benefit. Not so.

Click Here to Read Sig Cohen's full article...

An Alternative to Guardianship Made for Mediation
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Authored by , re: Elder Care, on .
An Alternative to Guardianship Made for Mediation|Sig Cohen

Well, if you die before she does, then she’ll need a guardian,” an attorney recently told a friend of mine. He was referring to my friend’s sister who relies largely on him to handle her financial, healthcare, and other concerns. The attorney’s remark was like the snap of a wet towel across his thigh. My friend realized: there is no one else he knows who lives nearby who can or would handle her needs. However, a guardianship may not necessarily be the only solution to his situation.

Click here to read Sig Cohen's full article...

Power of Attorney: Power in Your Hands
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Authored by , re: Elder Care, on .
Power of Attorney: Power in Your Hands | Robert W. Shaw

{Read in 3:50 minutes} What is a power of attorney? When an individual sets a power of attorney, it means they have appointed a trusted person to act on their behalf regarding any non-medical decisions, such as banking transactions or selling a home, if they are unable to do so because of incompetence or physical inability. The power of attorney is generally a durable power, meaning that it remains valid as long as the principal who made the appointment is unable to act themselves, and requires the signature of both the principal and the agent. For medical decisions, a healthcare proxy is needed.

Click here to read Robert W. Shaw's full article..

 

New York’s Family Health Care Decisions Act
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Authored by , re: Elder Care, on .
New York’s Family Health Care Decisions Act | Robert W. Shaw

The Family Health Care Decisions Act (FHCDA) went into effect in New York State in 2010. The law provides the procedure for appointment of a surrogate to make healthcare decisions for an individual who lacks the capacity to make their own decisions and who does not already have a healthcare proxy or court-appointed guardian in place. It makes it possible for a family member or loved one to withdraw life support for somebody that is in a near-death situation. Otherwise, because the individual does not have an agent to do their wishes, the treatment would have to continue indefinitely. This end-of-life decision-making process only applies in a hospital or nursing home setting. It does not apply in a home care setting.

Click here to read Robert W. Shaw's full article...

Don’t Leave Your Long-Term Care in the Hands of Medicaid
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Authored by , re: Elder Care, on .
Don’t Leave Your Long-Term Care in the Hands of Medicaid | Robert W. Shaw, Esq.

Even if you eventually receive Medicaid coverage from the government, insurance is a valuable supplement to cover the cost of long-term care. At today’s rates, a nursing home can easily cost $120,000 to $150,000 a year in New York. Medicare does not cover the cost of most long-term care situations, so it becomes very difficult for even an upper-middle-class family to pay for coverage. That is why having a long-term care policy can be so valuable.

Click here to read Robert W. Shaw's full article...

 

My Least Favorite Words
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Authored by , re: Elder Care, on .
My Least Favorite Words | Andrea Vacca

Everyone has words they dislike.  I have three:

The first is “facility.”  Especially when grouped with ‘assisted living’ or ‘continuing care,’ or ‘memory care.’ I’d always thought a facility is a place where things are made, or shipped from, or warehoused. Facilities are places for getting things done. Why do we apply the term ‘facility’ to describe places where older people reside? Residences or homes are where people live.  Like long-term care residences, or skilled-nursing homes.  Coupling the word facility with places where many seniors reside contributes to the objectification of older people, that is, treating them as an object or thing.

Click here to read Sig Cohen's full article...

Death Terms and Euphemisms
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Authored by , re: Elder Care, on .
Death Terms and Euphemisms | Carolyn Parr

From time to time, Tough Conversations will present articles by guest bloggers on topics of interest to our readers. M. Jane Markley, an expert on advance care planning, wonders why it’s so hard to talk about death:

Have you ever noticed just how difficult it is for people to say the word “death” or “died”? You mostly hear the terms when something horrific has happened like an earthquake or a bombing but in day to day life it is rare. This is part of our culture of death avoidance. Just take a look at the obituaries. If we don’t say it, perhaps it won’t or didn’t happen. If you listen carefully you will hear many other phrases or words used but rarely “death”.

Click here to read Carolyn Parr's full article...

Redeeming the Pain (A Book Review)
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Authored by , re: Elder Care, Family & Divorce, LAW RELATED ARTICLES, on .
Redeeming the Pain (A Book Review) | Carolyn Parr

Some books are better the second time around.  Even better the third, after life has delivered its lessons. Living Through Personal Crisis by Ann Kaiser Stearns is such a book. Its subject is grief over life’s losses, big and small. A painful divorce propelled the author, a clinical psychologist, chaplain, and professor, to write it. She had two purposes: to help others and to heal herself. In a video on her website, and in the Preface to her revised version, Dr. Stearns says resilience comes when we learn from our pain. When we find meaning in it.  We redeem our own suffering by using it to help someone else. And that makes us stronger.

Click here to read Carolyn Parr's full article...

Washington’s Latest Controversy . . . Over a Treehouse
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Authored by , re: Elder Care, on .
Washington’s Latest Controversy . . . Over a Treehouse |Sig Cohen

My wife and I live in Washington DC in a neighborhood called Capitol Hill. As such, it would seem that our lives would be consumed with:

  • National concern;
  • Tough legislative issues;
  • Key judicial decisions;
upon which the fate of the country turns. Right? Wrong. The major buzz in our neighborhood is about a house. Not the House of Representatives nor the White House, but, believe it or not, a tree house.

Click here to read Sig Cohen's full article...

Family Mediation for Elder Issues
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Authored by , re: Elder Care, Family & Divorce, on .
Family Mediation for Elder Issues | Sandy Balick

{2:54 minutes to read} In the minds of many, family mediation is usually associated with the contentious subjects of separation and divorce. But increasingly, family mediation is showing its value as a way to resolve a wide range of challenging family-related issues, particularly those involving aging individuals.

It differs from divorce mediation only in the objective. While divorce revolves around the dissolution of a marriage, the mediation of elder issues is all about the creation of improved family situations and better interpersonal relationships within the family.

Click here to read Sandy Balick's full article...

Right and Righteous? Give It Up!
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Authored by , re: Elder Care, on .
Right and Righteous? Give It Up! | Carolyn Parr

Picture this: An extended family is gathered for a Thanksgiving feast. A granddaughter announces she’s moving in with her boyfriend. A son has brought his same-sex partner to meet the family. You learn your favorite cousin had an abortion. The family vegetarian ostentatiously declines the turkey and anything it touched. Your Mom’s friend who helped make dinner is a guy 10 years younger than she and you suspect he’s more than a “friend.” A Marine in uniform and a peace activist complete the scene. (I’m only partially making this up. I’ve seen each of these situations – but, I confess, never all at once!)

Click here to read Carolyn Parr's full article...